Cleaning IKEA Plastic with Tide Oxi

Cleaning Plastic with Tide Oxi

We have these URBAN plastic chairs from IKEA. We LOVE these chairs. We use them as step stools, outdoors around the grill, additional seating… they are probably one of the more versatile things we have in our house. They are also surprisingly comfortable.

Cleaning Plastic with Tide Oxi

ANYWAYS, because of all the use, these chairs get dirty. And because plastic polypropylene has this nubby, rough texture these chairs attract dust, dirt and stains like maniacs. The rest of my IKEA plastic furniture is the same way (like the DOCKSTA round table). This dirt is hard to get out, even with something like a Magic Eraser.

That brings us to Tide Multi-Purpose Oxi, which is Tide’s take on Oxi Clean. They had me at “whiter and brighter,” which I think applies to laundry but let’s just go with it. It lists “patio furniture” as a possible application so I figured I’d give it a shot. Here’s what they looked like before. I had previously tried to wipe them off but this gross layer of gray remained.

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After soaking and scrubbing, these guys look almost good as new. I knew the dirt would come off easy but I was most impressed by its ability to remove that blue hue these chairs get from dyed jeans. Yes!

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And so then I got so excited I cleaned the top of the plastic cooler too, which has that same, hard-to-clean texture.

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I used two cups of Tide Oxi, filled the bucket with water, let the chairs soak in the soap and went to town with my scrubber.

Cleaning Plastic with Tide Oxi

Cleaning Plastic with Tide Oxi

Cleaning Plastic with Tide Oxi

This was one of those “close up for fall” type of chores and I gotta admit, it was kind of depressing. We’ll use one or two chairs in the house for various uses but the rest will go in the basement to wait out warmer temps.

Best part of this post? It’s a FRIDAY post which means it’s almost time to enjoy the weekend. Aaron and I are headed to Germania tonight. Maybe we’ll see you there?

xo,

emily

So this post is sorta sponsored? Tide Oxi gave me a Home Depot gift card to buy the product to write the post. Basically I was just geeked at the chance to work with P&G.

 

Box Gutters: The Final Chapter

The new box gutters are complete! I am so happy to not have to talk about this ever again!

Our box gutters were in bad, bad shape…

Box Gutters

So here’s the backstory. Back in March when we had really bad ice, snow and negative temperatures, we noticed water stains accumulating on the ceiling.

We figured out pretty quickly (thanks Dad, thanks Google!) that ice had been clogging up in the non-draining (aka collapsed) gutters, forcing any melted water to back up and run in between the rafters and on to the ceiling. This wasn’t the only gutter-related issue. We had a wet basement, wet outside walls, damp foundation… the whole bit.

If you read Manhattan Nest, Daniel’s gutter issue was very similar to mine. I am going to use his drawing, but basically, there is a functional box gutter (top) and then there is a totally rotted box gutter (bottom… obviously). Box gutters are a style of gutter normally attributed to 100-year-old+ homes and are built into the roof line. They consist of a wood frame, covered with metal and lined with a weather-resistant lining.

The proposal to reconstruct the gutters was brutal in terms of $$. We were about to embark on a kitchen remodel and a magazine shoot, so we put it off. Warmer weather was coming so the whole ice thing was about to become much less of an issue. I don’t know if putting it off was the right decision, but we gambled and won. We are so lucky we didn’t have any further damage.

In early June, we approved what we thought was the best estimate and scheduled them to start as soon as the BH&G crew left. Here is the list of items (direct from the proposal) we agreed on:

  •  Remove existing liners from box gutters
  • Wood replacement as needed to ensure proper drainage
  • Red rosin paper will be installed as underlayment and to act as moisture barrier
  • A new pre-finished steel receiver strip will be installed along cap board to lock new gutter into place
  • A 26-gauge galvanized steel box gutter liner shall then be installed with seams pop riveted, soldered and laced for strength
  • A new stainless steel outlet tube shall be installed to prevent rusting (galvanized outlet tubes cannot be properly maintained)
  • Ice and water guard installed at roof line to protect against ice dams
  • New liner to receive two cats of Direct to Metal (DTM) Tinners Red paint to protect metal from weather elements
  • New metal strainers will be installed at all outlet tubes
  • Install new 4 inch downspouts and necessary accessories to entire house
  • Apply one coat of paint to existing chimney flashing
  • Repair shingles with nail pops on entire house
  • Haul away all debris upon completion

To give an idea of exactly the repair process, here is my best guess. The existing liner and cover was removed, exposing the bad wood underneath.

Box Gutters

Next came reconstruction. A lot of time was spent ensuring everything was pointed toward a drain. New wood was placed as needed to build the structure back up.

Box Gutters

Box Gutters

Box Gutters

With the frames re-built, the metal liner went up. The new roof shingles along the perimeter were also replaced. I realize they are a different color, but you can’t see that from the street. I was cool with it.

Box Gutters

It took about 2 weeks to get it done, and that was with several rain delays that kept the roofers away. Overall, we’re very happy with the final result. Our basement is bone dry (for the first time in a long time!), our external walls are no longer damp and the best part: no more ceiling damage. The real test will be this winter when we’re battling the ice again.

We paid $10,720 for the job, which included some chimney and roof repair too. I do not say that number lightly. That is a lot of money for us, especially on something we can’t even see on a regular basis. There are a million other things we would have rather used that money on, but we’re glad to have this done and out of the way.

Best part of this is I don’t plan on talking about these darn gutters ever again. ;)

xo,

emily

Sofa Update

If you follow me on Facebook and/or Instagram, you know I was very excited to receive my new sofa last week. And well, it didn’t go quite as planned. At least not yet!

A little back story, I won the “Small” division of Apartment Therapy’s Small Cool Contest a few months ago and the prize was a $1000 gift card to Joybird Furniture. Awesome!

Our eyes were on the Calhoun loveseat to replace our Macy’s modern sofa. I talk a little bit about this in this post, but our existing sofa—the Clare sofa from Macy’s—was always too long for the space. Not by much, but enough to replace when a nearly free couch was on the other side. :)

We were so excited about the Calhoun loveseat because it had a smaller loveseat-like footprint, yet still quasi-sofa enough that Aaron could span the length of it without running out of room. We chose Walnut stain for the legs and Echo Pumice for the fabric. We were able to purchase the $1599 sofa during a 20% Fourth of July sale, which with our $1K gift card, put our out of pocket at $279. Not too shabby.

Calhoun Loveseat

The whole building process was so cool. These sofas are built from scratch for you, with email updates along the way with photos of the progress. Framing! Upholstering! Shipping! It was so cool to be able to follow along in the process. The Joybird team and their level of customer service is like no other.

All of this sounds all good but it arrived Tuesday and well… I knew it was wrong for me as soon as it was unpacked. The #1 problem was the fabric. The fabric that I picked was the wrong fabric and I take 100% responsibility. Ugh. I knew the swatch was microfiber (I was hoping for a more velvet appearance) but seeing it on the expanse of the sofa was horrific! I should have trusted my gut. I know I am not a microfiber fan. I know microfiber does not work on a mid-century modern / space-y sofa. DURR.

Sofa Saga

The shape was also a little different than what we expected. Not bad, but not exactly right either. It was a little too space age for us… even contemporary versus MCM. I also expected the arms to swing out a little bit more in person. In real life, the arms are in-line with the back of the sofa.

Sofa Saga

Sofa Saga

That very same day I called Joybird and asked to return the sofa. The great news about this company is that they know they are in the business of risky, sight-unseen furniture shopping. Because of this, they make it very easy to return the goods by offering free shipping back to California and no re-stocking fees. Yes! Awesome! They were so nice when I explained my issue over the phone. They will be back in a few days to pick it up.

Between now and then we’ve got to figure out a new sofa plan. I’m waiting on fabric swatches to arrive (I had thrown out the first batch) and we’ve got to pick a sofa. I can tell you we will probably go with a much safer choice this time. :)

You might be wondering what happened to the Macy’s sofa. Oh, it’s here…

Sofa Saga

 

It and the matching chair (you can see it on the left) are crammed into the bedroom at the moment. Getting to the bed is hilarious. Picture us jumping and rolling over the back of the sofa to land onto the mattress. Yay small space living!

So that’s my fun sofa update. It’s a bummer that we have to wait another 4-6 weeks to get another sofa here, but we’re so happy to be working with Joybird and we know we’ll find the right one.

Happy Monday!

xo,

emily