Box Gutters: The Final Chapter

The new box gutters are complete! I am so happy to not have to talk about this ever again!

Our box gutters were in bad, bad shape…

Box Gutters

So here’s the backstory. Back in March when we had really bad ice, snow and negative temperatures, we noticed water stains accumulating on the ceiling.

We figured out pretty quickly (thanks Dad, thanks Google!) that ice had been clogging up in the non-draining (aka collapsed) gutters, forcing any melted water to back up and run in between the rafters and on to the ceiling. This wasn’t the only gutter-related issue. We had a wet basement, wet outside walls, damp foundation… the whole bit.

If you read Manhattan Nest, Daniel’s gutter issue was very similar to mine. I am going to use his drawing, but basically, there is a functional box gutter (top) and then there is a totally rotted box gutter (bottom… obviously). Box gutters are a style of gutter normally attributed to 100-year-old+ homes and are built into the roof line. They consist of a wood frame, covered with metal and lined with a weather-resistant lining.

The proposal to reconstruct the gutters was brutal in terms of $$. We were about to embark on a kitchen remodel and a magazine shoot, so we put it off. Warmer weather was coming so the whole ice thing was about to become much less of an issue. I don’t know if putting it off was the right decision, but we gambled and won. We are so lucky we didn’t have any further damage.

In early June, we approved what we thought was the best estimate and scheduled them to start as soon as the BH&G crew left. Here is the list of items (direct from the proposal) we agreed on:

  •  Remove existing liners from box gutters
  • Wood replacement as needed to ensure proper drainage
  • Red rosin paper will be installed as underlayment and to act as moisture barrier
  • A new pre-finished steel receiver strip will be installed along cap board to lock new gutter into place
  • A 26-gauge galvanized steel box gutter liner shall then be installed with seams pop riveted, soldered and laced for strength
  • A new stainless steel outlet tube shall be installed to prevent rusting (galvanized outlet tubes cannot be properly maintained)
  • Ice and water guard installed at roof line to protect against ice dams
  • New liner to receive two cats of Direct to Metal (DTM) Tinners Red paint to protect metal from weather elements
  • New metal strainers will be installed at all outlet tubes
  • Install new 4 inch downspouts and necessary accessories to entire house
  • Apply one coat of paint to existing chimney flashing
  • Repair shingles with nail pops on entire house
  • Haul away all debris upon completion

To give an idea of exactly the repair process, here is my best guess. The existing liner and cover was removed, exposing the bad wood underneath.

Box Gutters

Next came reconstruction. A lot of time was spent ensuring everything was pointed toward a drain. New wood was placed as needed to build the structure back up.

Box Gutters

Box Gutters

Box Gutters

With the frames re-built, the metal liner went up. The new roof shingles along the perimeter were also replaced. I realize they are a different color, but you can’t see that from the street. I was cool with it.

Box Gutters

It took about 2 weeks to get it done, and that was with several rain delays that kept the roofers away. Overall, we’re very happy with the final result. Our basement is bone dry (for the first time in a long time!), our external walls are no longer damp and the best part: no more ceiling damage. The real test will be this winter when we’re battling the ice again.

We paid $10,720 for the job, which included some chimney and roof repair too. I do not say that number lightly. That is a lot of money for us, especially on something we can’t even see on a regular basis. There are a million other things we would have rather used that money on, but we’re glad to have this done and out of the way.

Best part of this is I don’t plan on talking about these darn gutters ever again. ;)

xo,

emily

Spikey Striped Plants

Two of these little spikey, striped guys have come to live with us.

Spiky Striped Aloe

If you recall, we killed off the basil plants that once inhabited these planters. It was a mix of neglect and bad lighting. I will miss that sweet basil smell… yum.

So, in search of a new solution, we knew we needed something that could handle filtered light and more importantly, be durable to our bouts of neglect. I think a succulent answers those needs!

The only problem with the planters (these from West Elm) is that there is no drainage. Not exactly an ideal situation for any type of plant. Because of this, I tried to be sure I had good soil. I say this like I know what I’m talking about… I am totally new to this! All I know is that the soil needs to be altered to ensure water drains better aka doesn’t sit on the roots.

So here’s what I did. I lined the bottom of each planter with pebbles, then I created a soil mixture made up of perlite and cactus potting soil. I combined equal parts perlite and soil. This might have been overkill because cactus potting soil already contains perlite, but I figured a little more couldn’t hurt.

image

The mixture in the bottom right of the below photo is what went into the planter. The stuff in the upper left hand corner is what the basil was planted in. Very different… hopefully that’s a good thing.

image

Anyways, they’ve been planted for a few days now and they’re doing well. I haven’t watered them because they’ve shown no signs of distress. I might use a spray bottle when the time comes to ensure I don’t overdo it.

Spiky Striped Aloe

This specific type of Aloe plant is called Haworthia and like most aloe plants, likes to be dry in the winter and a little more wet in the summer. All I care about is the stripes! They look like little zebra plants.

Spiky Striped Aloe

Spiky Striped Aloe

 

It feels so silly to dedicate an entire post to these little plants, but hey it’s Friday and we’re keeping things light over here.

We’ve got a pretty chill weekend planned, which I am SO excited about. I have some projects to work on, some design work to tackle and some NetFlix to catch up on. Speaking of NetFlix, we just watched this documentary called Maidentrip and it was FASCINATING. This 14-year old girl decided she wanted to be the youngest person to sail around the world… BY HERSELF. At one point she was at sea, alone, for 56ish days. She shoots a lot of footage herself and just is generally awesome. Her bucket list is so much cooler than mine.

TGIF

xo,

emily

p/s: No sponsorships exist in this post. I just really like Miracle Gro. ;)

 

Big ‘Ole Lamp

DSC_9239

 

When you see a 3′ tall hexagon lamp made of gold (faux, of course) for less than $20, there is only one approved reaction: PURCHASE IMMEDIATELY!

And that’s exactly what I did. I found this huge gold lamp at Home Style here in Covington and brought it home. I had an open spot on the little cabinet next to my bed. I’ve made over this corner so many times. The last version featured my plant of steel (which now lives in the living room, per the photo shoot folks) which left a spot for a very tall item.

Never in a million years did I think that very tall item would be a giant gold lamp from the 70′s, but here we are.

Giant Gold Lamp

The shade was a sale find at Home Goods. I bought the largest shade in the clearance section, which rings in at 20″. The shade really needs to be white, but for $20 and the size I need, this tan version is A-OK with me. One day I will cover the shade in white fabric, but I have to admit: the tan is growing on me!

You may remember me posting the pic below on Instagram. Suge is placed for scale which I’m sure he totally appreciated. I’m posting the Instagram pic below, but if you can’t see it, here’s the direct link.

I love how the new-to-me lamp works with my gold lamps on the dresser across the room. Like they were made for each other.

Bamboo Roller Shades

In other news and while we’re on the topic of this room, that copper overhead light is going to be replaced by a fan. Function wins over form (Aaron is so thrilled!). We’re fan people and our current set-up (an old dusty box fan leaning on a plastic chair) is just not working out. Bye bye light. You’re pretty but you don’t provide a good breeze.

DIY Copper Light

That’s all I’ve got for now. Be back Friday!

xo,

emily